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CARE OF STABLE MANURE

Analysis Of Manure
Caring For Liquid Manure
Common Source Of Losses
Composts
Harmless Fermentation
Rotted Manure
Spreading As Made
The Covered Yard
Use Of Preservatives

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A Few Combinations Are Safest
A Practical Test
A Southern Legume
A Three Years' Rotation
Acid Phosphate
Acquaintance With Terms
Adaptation To Eastern Needs
Affecting Physical Condition
All The Nitrogen From Clover
Alsike Clover
Amount Of Application
Amount Of Manure



Rotted Manure








Mixed stable manure contains in a ton as many pounds of
potash as it does of nitrogen, and yet we speak of it as a highly
nitrogenous fertilizer. When fresh manure has suffered no loss of the
liquid part, much of its nitrogen is almost immediately available. The
nitrogen in the urine is in soluble forms, and fermentation quickly
occurs. When manure is used on grass, it cannot be too fresh, as the
immediate action of the nitrogen is desirable. Vegetable growers often
prefer a slower and more continuous action, and the rotting of manure
under right conditions changes the liquid nitrogen into compounds that
act more slowly.

The solid material in horse manure contains less water than that of the
cow, and this absence of water permits quick fermentation when air is
present. The use of large quantities of such manure per acre is not
liked by vegetable-growers. Rotting under control in a covered barnyard
has a beneficial effect for this reason when a hot manure is not
wanted. The covered shed costs some money, and there is a loss
estimated at 10 per cent under the best conditions, but when manure
cannot be drawn fast as made, there is compensation in improved
condition for certain soils and crops.





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Previous: Harmless Fermentation



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