VIEW THE MOBILE VERSION of www.sustainablefarming.ca Informational Site Network Informational
Privacy

THE USE OF STABLE MANURE

Controlling Factors
Direct Use For Corn
Effect Upon Moisture
Heavy Applications
Manure On Grass
Manure On Potatoes
Poultry Manure
Reenforcement With Minerals
When To Plow Down

More from THE USE OF STABLE MANURE

Crops And Methods For Soil Improvement


A Bit Of Arithmetic
A Clean Seed-bed
A Few Combinations Are Safest
A Practical Test
A Southern Legume
A Three Years' Rotation
Acid Phosphate
Acquaintance With Terms
Adaptation To Eastern Needs
Affecting Physical Condition
All The Nitrogen From Clover
Alsike Clover
Amount Of Application
Amount Of Manure



Manure On Grass








When the crop-rotation embraces two or more years of
grass, or one of clover followed by only one of grass, it is better
practice to use the manure to thicken the sod. The object in view is
the largest possible amount of crops, and the maximum amount of organic
matter for the soil. Grass is a heavy feeder, like corn, and makes good
use of nitrogen. Its roots fill the soil so that no loss attends the
use of manure. When the supply is given the grass, after the harvest of
the second crop of clover and during the winter, the timothy can make a
rank growth. The part of the plant above ground has corresponding
development below ground. Not only does a large increase in the hay
crop result, but the heavy mass of grass roots, the aftermath, and the
remains of the manure provide a great amount of fertility for the corn
which follows. The increase in hay permits a corresponding increase in
the manure supply the next year, if it is fed, and if it is sold on
account of a market price greater than its value for feed and manure,
it adds to income materially--and that is one reason for farming.





Next: Manure On Potatoes

Previous: Effect Upon Moisture



Add to del.icio.us Add to Reddit Add to Digg Add to Del.icio.us Add to Google Add to Twitter Add to Stumble Upon
Add to Informational Site Network
Report
Privacy
SHAREADD TO EBOOK


Viewed 403