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Grains and Forage Crops

A Summer Hay Crop
Alfalfa And Alkali
Alfalfa And Bermuda
Alfalfa And Overflow
Alfalfa And Soil Depth
Alfalfa Hay And Soil Fertility
Alfalfa On Adobe
Alfalfa Sowing With Gypsum
Alfilaria And Winter Pasturage
Barley And Alfalfa
Barley On Moist Land
Beets And Potatoes
Beets For Stock
Bermuda Grass
Bermuda Objectionable

More from Grains and Forage Crops

One Thousand Questions In California Agriculture Answereds


- If Your Land Needs It At All
1/2 Pounds Gain In Weight Per Day
10 Cents A Hundred For Crushing And The Hauling
18 To 20 Inches Above The Ground
3/4 To 1 Pound Of Rolled Barley Or Corn For Each 100 Pounds Live Weight
4 Ounces Olive Oil She Will Recover After Parturition
50 Per Cent Was White While The Balance Was Yellow And Went To The Top
5:30 P M Being Fed At 7 A M?
A Dry Mash
A Free Martin
A Mangy Cow
A Neck-swelling
A Point On Mating
A Sterile Cow



Don't Get Crazy About Special Crops








I want information about flax as a crop. I have been having some land
graded for alfalfa and I have had to wait so long I am now doubting the
advisability of seeding it all under these conditions until fall, as hot
weather will soon come. I want some good crop to plant in the checks and
give two good irrigations. What would you think about rye for straw for
horse collars? I do not wish to consider corn, as the stalks would be
troublesome. Potatoes would necessitate disarranging the land too much
and would require more attention than I am in shape to give just flow.
Everybody grows wheat, barley and oats. I want something that I can get
a special market for.

To succeed with flax, the seed ought to be sown in the fall, or early
winter, in California, and the plant will make satisfactory growth under
about the same conditions that suit barley or wheat. Spring sowing would
not give you anything worth while except on moist bottom land. Rye is
also a winter-growing grain. To grow rye straw for horse collars would
be unprofitable unless you could find some local saddler who could use a
little, and it is probable you could not get a summer growth of rye
which would give good straw, even if you had a market for it. You could
get a growth of stock beets, field squashes, or pumpkins for stock
feeding. In fact, the latter would give you most satisfaction if you
have stock to which they can be fed to advantage. Sorghum is our chief
dry-season crop, but that makes stalks like corn and would, therefore,
be open to the same objections. Has it never occurred to you that people
grow the common crops, not because they are stupid, but because those
are the things for which there is a constant demand and the best chance
for profitable sale? Efforts to supply special markets are worth
thinking of, but seldom worth making unless you know just who is going
to buy the product and at what price.





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