Sit in front of a fire, go into alpha, and hold some kosher salt in your left hand. Allow your feelings for the one you love to go into the salt. Just as the salt is sprinkled on food to flavor it, visualize your love flavo... Read more of SALTED FIRE LOVE SPELL at White Magic.caInformational Site Network Informational
Privacy

Vegetable Growing

Adobe And Peanuts
Artichoke Growing
Asparagus Growing
Bad Conditions For Potatoes
Bean Growing
Bean Growing
Beans As Nitrogen Gatherers
Beans On Irrigated Mesas
Big Worms On Tomatoes
Blackeye Beans
Blackeye Beans Are Cow Peas
Blanching Celery
Blooming Brussels Sprouts
California Grown Seed
Canada Peas For Seed

More from Vegetable Growing

One Thousand Questions In California Agriculture Answereds


- If Your Land Needs It At All
1/2 Pounds Gain In Weight Per Day
10 Cents A Hundred For Crushing And The Hauling
18 To 20 Inches Above The Ground
3/4 To 1 Pound Of Rolled Barley Or Corn For Each 100 Pounds Live Weight
4 Ounces Olive Oil She Will Recover After Parturition
50 Per Cent Was White While The Balance Was Yellow And Went To The Top
5:30 P M Being Fed At 7 A M?
A Dry Mash
A Free Martin
A Mangy Cow
A Neck-swelling
A Point On Mating
A Sterile Cow



The Yard-long Bean








I wish to ask about the very long bean which I think was introduced from
China into California. I remember seeing one vine when I was living in
California which I think must have been 20 or 30 feet long and had
hundreds of pods and each of these pods were from 2 to 3 feet long. Are
these beans generally considered eatable? Would they be at all suitable
to get as a field bean which the hogs eat?

You probably refer to the "yard-long" pole bean. It is a world variety
and may have come to California from China as you suggest, but it has
also been well known for generations in Europe and was brought thence to
the Eastern States at some early date. It is generally accounted as an
unimportant species and certainly has not risen to commercial account in
California. The beans are edible and the whole plant available for stock
feeding, but there is no doubt but that the growth of some of the
cowpeas would be preferable as a summer field crop for hog pasture.





Next: Why The Beans Are Waiting

Previous: Bean Growing



Add to del.icio.us Add to Reddit Add to Digg Add to Del.icio.us Add to Google Add to Twitter Add to Stumble Upon
Add to Informational Site Network
Report
Privacy
SHAREADD TO EBOOK


Viewed 163