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Vegetable Growing

Adobe And Peanuts
Artichoke Growing
Asparagus Growing
Bad Conditions For Potatoes
Bean Growing
Bean Growing
Beans As Nitrogen Gatherers
Beans On Irrigated Mesas
Big Worms On Tomatoes
Blackeye Beans
Blackeye Beans Are Cow Peas
Blanching Celery
Blooming Brussels Sprouts
California Grown Seed
Canada Peas For Seed

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Growing Horse Beans








Does the soil need to be inoculated for horse beans? I intend to plant
five acres about January 1, on the valley border in Placer county and
they get heavy frost in the morning. Does frost hurt them? How shall I
plant them?

California experience is that horse beans grow readily without
inoculation of the seed. Quite a good growth of the plant is being
secured in many parts of the State, particularly in the coast region
where the plant seems to thrive best. It is one of the hardiest of the
bean family and will endure light frost. How hardy it will prove in your
place could be told only by a local experiment. Whether it can be
planted after frost danger is over, as corn is, and make satisfactory
growth and product in the dry heat of the interior summer must also be
determined by experience.

The horse bean is a tall growing, upright plant which is successfully
grown in rows far enough apart for cultivation, say about 2 1/2 feet,
the seed dropped thinly so that the plants will stand from 6 inches to 1
foot apart in the row.





Next: Growing Castor Beans

Previous: Blackeye Beans Are Cow Peas



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